Practice Areas

Practice Area

Green Card/Permanent Resident

Having a Green Card, also known as a Permanent Resident Card allows you to live and work permanently in the United States. The steps you must take to apply for a Green Card will vary depending on your individual situation. As proof of that status, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) grants a person a permanent resident card.

Naturalization/U.S. Citizenship

Naturalization/U.S. Citizenship

Naturalization is the process by which U.S. citizenship is granted to a lawful permanent resident after meeting the requirements established by Congress in the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). USCIS has a variety of study materials available for the naturalization test at www.uscis.gov.

Asylum/Refugee

Asylum/Refugee

Asylum is a protection grantable to foreign nationals already in the United States or arriving at the border who meet the international law definition of a “refugee.”
Refugee status is a form of protection that may be granted to people who meet the definition of refugee and who are of special humanitarian concern to the United States. Refugees are generally people outside of their country who are unable or unwilling to return home because they fear serious harm.

Business/Investor

Business/Investor

A commercial or business visa is a government-issued document that allows non-citizens to enter a foreign country temporarily for business purposes.
The investor visa program is known as EB-5 for the name of the employment-based fifth preference visa that participants receive. Congress created the EB-5 Program in 1990 to stimulate the U.S. economy through job creation and capital investment by foreign investors.

Deportation/Removal

Deportation/Removal

Deportation or removal happens when the U.S. Federal Government formally removes a noncitizen from the United States. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) conducts removal proceedings through the Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency (ICE). ICE may formally remove an immigrant from the U.S. for various reasons. Among them are violations of immigration conditions or the commission of certain criminal acts.

Appeals

Appeals

Immigration appeals are essentially a way to ask a higher authority to review a case and determine whether the unfavorable action was appropriate. The Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) is the highest administrative body for interpreting and applying immigration laws.

Waivers

Immigration waivers are mostly available for immigration fraud or misrepresentation of a material fact to obtain immigration benefits (212(i)), inadmissibility for criminal and related grounds (212(h)), certain health-related grounds (212(g)). An individual who is ineligible to be admitted to the United States as an immigrant or to adjust status in the United States, and certain nonimmigrant applicants who are inadmissible may file a waiver of inadmissibility.

Writ of Mandamus/Federal Court

Writ of Mandamus/Federal Court

A (writ of) mandamus is an order from a court to an inferior government official ordering the government official to properly fulfill their official duties or correct an abuse of discretion. A writ is filed in U.S. Federal Court. A writ of mandamus can be filed against a court, governmental body, or government official. It comes from the Latin word “we command”.

Student Visa

Student Visa

A student visa (F or M) is required to study in the United States. The first step is to apply to a SEVP-approved school in the United States. The SEVP-approved school will issue you a Form I-20.

Tourist/Visitor Visa

Tourist/Visitor Visa

Visitor visas are nonimmigrant visas for persons who want to enter the United States temporarily for business (B-1), or tourism (B-2)).

Diversity Visa Lottery

Diversity Visa Lottery

The Diversity Immigrant Visa Program, also known as the green card lottery, is a United States government lottery program for receiving a United States Permanent Resident Card. The Immigration Act of 1990 established the current and permanent Diversity Visa (DV) program. There are 55,000 immigrant visas available annually.

Seizures/Forfeitures CBP

Seizures/Forfeitures CBP

Property may be “seized” for certain violations of Customs and related laws. In a seizure, a government official takes physical possession of currency/money or merchandise or other article, such as a vehicle, vessel, or aircraft. Section 883 provides for seizure and forfeiture of improperly transported merchandise or assessment of a monetary penalty equal to the domestic value of such merchandise. Customs may assess a penalty against the master, owner, or any party responsible for improper transportation.

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